Grapes from the Wachau

Grapes from the Wachau

Sunrise over Dürnstein

Sunrise over Dürnstein

Panoramaphoto from Dürnstein

Panoramaphoto from Dürnstein

Living where the wine lives. The 4-Star-Hotel Pfeffel in Dürnstein / Wachau

 

The Wachau valley

In 2000, the cultural region of the Wachau, which includes the monasteries in Melk and Göttweig as well as the old city of Krems, became officially designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

The Wachau is a length of river land just over 30 km long between Krems an der Donau and Melk, originating from the Danube’s water gap through the Bohemian Massif and existing as the border region to Austria’s granite-gneiss plateau. Its highest points are the Jauerling (960 m) and Sandl (723 m). The Wachau lies on the border between two quarters of Lower Austria, with the Mostviertel to the south and the Waldviertel to the north. It also contains the Spitzer Graben, a tributary of the Danube.

 

Tipp: Each Thursday at 5.30 p.m., visitors can take a guided tour of Dürnstein and the convent, followed by a glass of good local wine and a trip with a local train across the Loiben Mountain.

Ruin of Dürnstein

Ruin of Dürnstein

Details: Ruin of Dürnstein

The Benedictine Abbey of Göttweig

The Benedictine Abbey of Göttweig

Details: The Benedictine Abbey of Göttweig

Abbey of Melk

Abbey of Melk

Details: Abbey of Melk

Hiking in the Wachau

Hiking in the Wachau

Details: Hiking in the Wachau

Shipping in the wachau

Shipping in the wachau

Details: shipping

Apricot meets grape

Apricot meets grape

The Wachau valley is well-known for its tasty apricots and likewise for the viniculture. The Gartenhotel & Weingut Pfeffel offers both. Visit the Wachau while the apricots are blooming or at harvest time, also you are able to see the wine harvesting in autumn.

apricot & honey

wine offer